Social Security Tips – April 2016

Medicare enrollment using our online application

 

It’s convenient, quick and easy. There’s no need to drive to a local Social Security office or wait for an appointment with a Social Security representative.

Use our online application to sign up for Medicare. It takes less than 10 minutes. In most cases, once your application is submitted electronically, you’re done. There are no forms to sign and usually no documentation is required. Social Security will process your application and contact you if we need more information. Otherwise, you’ll receive your Medicare card in the mail.

Medicare is managed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Social Security works with CMS by enrolling people in Medicare.

For more information about applying for Medicare only and delaying retirement benefits, visit Applying for Medicare Only – Before You Decide.

 

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Getting benefits while working

You can work while you receive Social Security retirement (or survivors) benefits. When you do, it could mean a higher benefit for you in the future.

Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. We pay the increase retroactive to January the year after you earned the money.

Higher benefits can be important to you later in life and increase the future benefit amounts your family and your survivors could receive.

If you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, your earnings may reduce your benefit amount. (If you were born between 1/2/1943 and 1/1/1955, your full retirement age is 66 years.)

  • If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, we deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. For 2016, that limit is $15,720.
  • In the year you reach full retirement age, we deduct $1 in benefits for every $3 you earn above a different limit. In 2016, the limit on your earnings is $41,880 but we only count earnings before the month you reach your full retirement age.
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