Social Security Tips – January 2019

 

How you can get a replacement Social Security Benefit Statement  (SSA-1099)

 

A Social Security 1099 is a tax form Social Security mails each year in January to people who receive Social Security benefits. It shows the total amount of benefits received from Social Security in the previous year.

 

For people that live in the United States and need a replacement form SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S, they can go online and request an instant, printable replacement form through their personal mySocial Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

 

You can obtain a replacement SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S for 2018 after February 1.

 

For those that already have a mySocial Security account, they log in to view and print the SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S. No printer? They can save it to their computer or email it.

 

If your clients are on the fence about creating a mySocial Security account, remind them of all the convenient services available to them at their fingertips once they have an account. For those receiving benefits and/or have Medicare, their mySocial Security account is also the best way to:

 

  • Get a benefit verification letter;
  • Check benefit and payment information;
  • Change an address and phone number;
  • Change direct deposit information;
  • Request a replacement Medicare card; or
  • Report wages if working and receiving SSDI or SSI benefits.

 

Noncitizens that live outside of the United States and received or repaid Social Security benefits in 2018 will receive an SSA-1042S in the mail.

 

The forms SSA-1099 and SSA-1042S are not available for people who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

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The Q&A for the month:

Question: We have a client who is subject to the offsets as he was a firefighter. After retiring from this, he then went on to work part-time and received enough credits to be eligible for a SS benefit. Based off of his benefit estimate, it is less than half of what his spouse will be receiving. Is he eligible for a spousal benefit?

 

Answer: Because he has 40 credits, he will receive a Social Security retirement benefit but it will be reduced because of the Windfall Elimination Provision. He can file for spouse’s benefits on his wife’s record but he is subject to the Government Pension Offset which will probably wipe the spousal benefit out to zero. See link for details: https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/gpo-wep.html

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